Dog and Cat Fleas


Cat and dog fleas are very similar in appearance and both species can live on both cats and dogs. Humans are mainly attacked by cat fleas. A cat or dog may have a light infestation of fleas without the human inhabitants knowing it, but if the pets are carrying large numbers of fleas, then there is naturally a greater likelihood of humans being bitten. A heavy infestation may occur if the cat or dog is removed from the house, for then the insect has no alternative but to feed off humans.
Dog Flea

The dog flea (Ctenocephalides canis) is a species of flea that lives as an ectoparasite on a wide variety of mammals, particularly the domestic dog and cat. It closely resembles the cat flea, Ctenophalides felis, which can live on a wider range of animals and is generally more prevalent worldwide.

The dog flea is troublesome because it can spread Dipylidium caninum (flea tapeworm).

Although they feed on the blood of dogs and cats, they sometimes bite humans. They can live without food for several months, but females must have a blood meal before they can produce eggs. They can deliver about 4000 eggs on the host's fur. The eggs go through four lifecycle stages: embryo, larva, pupa, and imago (adult). This whole life cycle from egg to adult takes from two to three weeks, although this depends on the temperature. It may take longer in cool conditions.

Cat Flea

The cat flea (Ctenocephalides felis) is one of the most abundant and widespread species of flea on Earth.

The cat flea is a small, sucking, insect of the order Siphonoptera. Adults range from 1–2 mm long and are usually a reddish-brown colour, although this can vary. The cat flea, and all other fleas, are compressed laterally, resulting in an extremely thin insect that can be quite hard to find in an animal's coat.[

The cat flea's primary host is the domestic cat, but the cat flea is also the primary flea infesting dogs in most of the world. The cat flea can also maintain its life cycle on other carnivores and on omnivores. Humans can be bitten, though a long-term population of cat fleas cannot be sustained and infest people. However, if the female flea is allowed to feed for twelve consecutive hours on a human, it can lay viable eggs.